Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology


Dr. Birandr Sinha
Professor
NIH
USA
Dr. Seetharama D. S. Jois
Professor
University of Louisiana at Monroe,
USA
Dr. Jaroslav Cermak
Scientist,
Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion,
SPAIN
Prof. P C Leung
Professor,
Chinese University of Hong Kong,
CHINA
About The Journal
'Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology(JDE)’ is free medical journal that addresses the different aspects and advancement in Diabetses and Endocrinology, related syndromes and their medications and publishes papers relevant to the recent developments and prevention of diabetes, Obesity, Endocrinology.
Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology(JDE), is an open access, peer reviewed journal aims to publish original quality papers in the relevant areas of current advanced research includes diagnosis, pathogenesis, and clinical management of Diabetic retinopathy, Diabetic Nephropathy, Diabetic Neuropathy, Gestational diabetes, etc. to welcome submissions towards the journal.
It is an Open access scholarly journal publishes the most complete and reliable source of information on the discoveries and current developments in the mode of original articles, review articles, case reports, short communications, etc. in all areas of the field and making them freely available through online without any subscriptions.


37%
Acceptance
60 Days
Final Decision
45 Days
Publication
$ 700
APC
Some of Major Focus area of this Journal are:


Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes is a lifelong disease that prevents your body from using insulin the right way. People with type 2 diabetes are said to have insulin resistance.
It’s the most common type of diabetes. There are about 27 million people in the U.S. with type 2. Another 86 million have prediabetes: Their blood glucose is not normal, but not high enough to be diabetes yet. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes can be so mild you don't notice them.


Diabetic Mastopathy
Diabetic mastopathy is an uncommon complication of diabetes characterised by tough masses that develop in the breast. Most commonly diagnosed in premenopausal women with type 1 diabetes. The cause of this condition is unknown Symptoms may include hard, irregular, easily movable, discrete, painless breast mass. This condition can involve one or both breasts and can affect males and females. The cause of diabetic mastopathy is unknown. Theories include an autoimmune reaction, genetic factors such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type, association with insulin therapy, and association with hyperglycemia. Diabetic mastopathy usually occurs in women with ‘juvenile-onset‘ diabetes. Diabetic fibrous mastopathy is virtually indistinguishable from breast cancer.


Diabetes and Pregnancy
Presence of diabetes in mother during pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects in baby by 2-3 folds. High blood sugar in mother during pregnancy poses risks like miscarriage, growth restriction/acceleration in the baby, macrosomia (fetal obesity) etc. Gestational diabetes which usually occurs during third trimester of pregnancy has fewer risks than diabetes before pregnancy and it is reversible. Blood sugar must levels be regulated during pregnancy using proper medication and dietary measures.


Obesity
Obesity is a complex disorder involving an excessive amount of body fat. Obesity isn't just a cosmetic concern. It increases your risk of diseases and health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.
Being extremely obese means you are especially likely to have health problems related to your weight.
Obesity is most commonly caused by a combination of excessive food intake, lack of physical activity, and genetic susceptibility. A few cases are caused primarily by genes, endocrine disorders, medications, or mental disorder. The view that obese people eat little yet gain weight due to a slow metabolism is not medically supported. On average, obese people have a greater energy expenditure than their normal counterparts due to the energy required to maintain an increased body mass.


Diabetic Nephropathy
Diabetic Nephropathy is a microvascular complication which occurs in about one-third of patients affected with diabetes. It can cause irreversible damage to the kidneys and patient may require regular dialysis. It is diagnosed by persistent albuminuria and decline in glomerular filtration rate. It can be managed by maintaining blood sugar levels, blood pressure and taking proper diet.


Diabetic Retinopath
Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye problems that can affect people with diabetes. These conditions include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, cataracts, and glaucoma.
Over time, diabetes can cause damage to your eyes that can lead to poor vision or even blindness. But you can take steps to prevent diabetic eye disease, or keep it from getting worse, by taking care of your diabetes.


Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus
Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a rare kidney disorder that may be inherited or acquired. NDI is not related to the more common diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes), in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. NDI is a distinct disorder caused by complete or partial resistance of the kidneys to arginine vasopressin (AVP). Vasopressin is an antidiuretic hormone used by the kidney to manage water balance in the body. NDI causes chronic excessive thirst (polydipsia), excessive urine production (polyuria), and potentially dehydration. If left untreated, repeated episodes of severe dehydration may develop, eventually resulting in serious complications. Most cases of hereditary NDI are inherited as X-linked recessive disorders. Rare cases are inherited as an autosomal recessive or dominant disorder. Two different genes have been identified that cause hereditary NDI. NDI may also be acquired during life as a result of drug use (e.g., lithium therapy), kidney disease, obstruction of the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder (ureters), and prolonged metabolic imbalances such as low levels of potassium in the blood (hypokalemia) or high levels of calcium in the blood (hypercalcemia). NDI may also be a temporary complication associated with pregnancy.




Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology


Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology


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